2018 marks 30 years of operation for Superior Jetties®.

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For 30 years Superior has been providing high quality flotation and industrial products to a variety of industries throughout Australia and internationally.

To review the last 30 years, we have decided to gather a few images that reflect the pursuit of personalised customer service, industry leading innovation and ‘turnkey’ products and services. We have always tried to live up to our brand values of trust, creative imagination, personal service and exceptional results.

John Hogan, CEO of Superior Jetties recently spoke about his pride in the team in reaching 30 years of operation. “This is truly a credit to the wonderful people who always make it happen at Superior. Joint partnerships with customers, suppliers and stakeholders have been critical to making Superior a Gold Coast success story since 1988.”

“30 years is a solid milestone and calls for a celebration” John said.

Not only in Australia but in the international arena, Superior has witnessed great change, and in some instances, been the facilitator of changes within the industry.

From the engineering of unique flotation devices for industrial use; the award-winning Waterscape entertainment platform, to the market leading Super Elite reinforced concrete pontoon system, Superior has responded to customers’ needs and produced the results.” John said.

“We believe that Superior has facilitated an expectation of high standards within the industry in Australia, which has led to increasing demand for our products and services internationally.”

In celebration of Superior’s 30 year milestone, we are showing images of projects completed over the years.

We welcome any further images from stakeholders, which will be displayed at SCIBS in May.

 

 

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The 5 Quick Tips of berthing

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1 The Obvious
Ensure there is sufficient depth of water at all tides in an environment that is without waves or swell.  In fact if there is wave action in excess of 300mm the location is most unsuitable for the permanent berth.

2 The Limit
To ensure the vessel is well secured a berth such as a fixed or floating structure should be at least 80% of the length of the vessel.  If this is not possible then the distance can be augmented by a mooring pile that supports the vessel in association with the berth.

3 The Wind
The primary thought is always the safety of the vessel and to this end the owner will always wonder what forces can impact this safe harbour.  In all of the calculations of current or berthing impacts it is the power of the wind upon the sail area of the vessel that must be resisted by the lines and cleats.

4 The Spring Line 
This is the diagonal one running longitudinally bow to stern.  This should be as long as possible.  It will prevent the vessel moving forward and aft along the dock face.

5 Ropes

Lines should be used to their maximum length wherever possible as this allows more stretch to be applied initially as well as less chance of breaking under strain.  In poor weather double lines is done before a storm, and even direct to piles if in doubt about the cleat strength.

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Water Front Real Estate Mini Series – Property Boundaries (2)

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Superior has created a Water front Mini series about all the things you need to know when purchasing a water front property and the things to look out for. This week CEO John Hogan talks about property boundaries and how they reflect the vessel size that can be parked on that property. Also explained is a Quayline and what this means in water front properties.

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Water Front Real Estate Mini Series – Dredging & Canal Profiles (1)

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Superior has created a Water front Mini series about all the things you need to know when purchasing a water front property and the things to look out for. This week CEO John Hogan talks about dredging and the impacts it can have on your vessel and pontoon.

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Whitsunday Promotions

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This week I have been in the Whitsundays and living on board while participating in some of the events that are focused around boating.  This region of Australia is doing a great job in promoting the boating lifestyle and this activity can be seen in the improving infrastructure that has happened already as well as more planned.
The Audi Hamilton Island Race Week, #AHIRW is a major example of a winning promotion with a 30 year tradition that brings sailors from all over the world.  The weather was perfect, the national parks course scenery is stunning, the humpback whales majestic and everyone has a great time.  There are even visiting Superyachts such as Vava II in attendance such is the reach these days.  The marina is full to overflowing and this is a healthy sign for the industry.
Of course this week was preceded by Airlie Beach race week which is the prefect build up event and this saw the Abel Point Marina equally busy along with a bustling tourist trade.  The marina is under new management and has a healthy capitals works plan already started with new facilities including a tavern on the site which will be one of the best spots in the Whitsundays.
On the weekend of the 26th the Shag Island Cruising Yacht Club held their rendezvous which had hundreds of attendees to this fun event which raises money for charity from a totally volunteer organisation.  The music played into the night in the most perfect surroundings.
Coming back to work today I feel a little sad to be leaving these pristine waters, however I am also proud of this area where I had grown up.  These world class events are putting the area on the map and allowing thousands of people to experience nature up close.  A local told us when we moored to an environmentally friendly buoy with no anchors on the coral reef around Blue Pearl Bay that this was the best spot to see it all in the Whitsundays.  Then he said “don’t forget to say G’day to the resident Maori Wras Gus”.  Isn’t this better than the days when all we wanted to do was to eat Gus?
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Global industry recognition an honour

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Superior received an award at the Australian Marine Export & Superyacht Industry Awards held the week of the Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show.  It was an honour to receive an award for our achievements offshore.

Superior has been focussed on an export strategy for over a decade and we are involved in many international projects that are exciting and challenging. Currently we are working on multiple projects in China including one marina in Nanchang as well as work in Shanghai. Other projects include delivery of our Capri products to Malaysia and ongoing work in the Seychelles. New projects are in the pipeline in other parts of China and Fiji.

The AIMEX Awards were held to reward the outstanding achievements of Australian marine industry exporters and the Australian superyacht industry manufacturers and service providers. Superior was recognised for the category ‘Best Marine Industry Export Marketing Strategy’.  Superior has used a strategy of attending international exhibitions to establish a network of dealers and licensees.  These local contacts are then able to offer fast services with a quality proven product either built in Australia, or locally using Superior designs and project management.  Such innovation has expanded the reach of the company, which now offers value into markets once deemed to difficult to service.

The award was welcome recognition for the significant commercial and government projects we have undertaken around the world including marinas, jetties, ferry terminals, piling and resort aquatic areas.

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Marina Construction Cost

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Many marina owners are faced with the challenge of how to determine the fair cost of a major capital investment such as a new floating marina. The actual product is a combination of structural and civil engineering, geotechnical and environmental considerations along with complex social issues throughout the increasingly detailed approval processes. After myriad issues one can hear the collective sigh of relief that the life cycle of such structures exceeds 20 years.
Given the size of the investment we like to suggest some care goes into the early choices that set the foundations of ongoing cost of ownership and maintenance. Many of these issues are covered in our book Sustainable Marina Development published recently. The primary choice is the site and this is critical with an old adage being that if the location is somewhere that is a safe anchorage, then that is the first clue to being a good marina site as well.

Once the site is closed and secured the issues turn to the type if floating berths and how they are secured in place. The primary consideration in floating berths is to have enough mass to minimise passing wakes or waves that cause movement in the marina. This movement translates into maintenance and therefore cost, so a smooth site is a happy site for all concerned. Heavy concrete marinas exceed 300kg per square metre and this serves to make the site very secure by ironing out surface chop. It will not stop a major swell and cannot make a bad site into a good one.

Sometimes metal decked systems with bolted flotation is preferred. This is useful where current or floods are a consideration as the gaps in the flotation are useful to allow debris and current to pass by the structure. The mass may be less than concrete however the system is designed with strong metal connections that hold the whole system in place.

Regardless of the system that is chosen the elements need to be good quality with a well thought out design. Services should be easily accessible and have redundancy to allow for future technology and growth in demand. Cleats need to be designed to break prior to the marina pontoons and in this way minimising damage and repair costs. This may seem unnecessary until a boater powers out of a berth with a line still connected; yes it does happen!

Overall marina design has progressed in many ways over the past 50 years and today’s quality floating platforms provide welcome harbours for vessels. Add to this the social atmosphere that attracts people and marinas are a valuable part of the urban landscape.

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Patterson Lakes enters the second phase

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A highlight last week was my visit to Patterson Lakes a short drive down the Mornington Penninsula from Melbourne. This wide expanse of canals is under the management of Melbourne Water and they have Fulton Hogan as the Project Managers to deliver the largest infrastructure upgrade in the past 20 years. Each structure in the canals has been audited in a complete survey by GHD and the old wooden structures are being removed to receive a replacement jetty. This new design still has a wooden piles support, however the deck is supported with long lasting aluminium and a timber deck. Each home owner is consulted and offered the option to upgrade to a floating pontoon if desired.

Superior has a 25 year tradition of servicing residential clients so it has been a good partnership with a permanent crew on site along with one of our barges, Lobster, permanently located in Victoria for piling and demolition work. The Lobster craft is ideal along with pusher workboat Shrimp to access the tight lock gates and service the whole project from outside the residential estate.

Scott Edwards and the team at VCMC are our partners in this project and this team produces Superior products now in Victoria close to the site for quick and efficient response to client needs. On a water tour this week I was struck by the amount of floating equipment on the canals with more than 50% of customers choosing floating pontoons in preference to fixed structures. One tinny hanging by its mooring ropes was proof enough that fixed moorings are not a great idea anymore when floating is so easy to install and operate these days. Added to this were many boatlifts, skidocks, cruisers and kayaks showing living by the waters edge has similar appeal wherever you live.

Superior is now delivering the Sunstream boatlift solution to Victoria so we now have stock on site and ready to go to store your boat through the winter. Now is the best time to buy while transport is subsidised with the other works on site.

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New insights for floating marinas

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Last Friday in bright sunshine and on a windless day in Portland, Victoria, a new chapter was heralded in the area’s long maritime history. It was a day when dreams came true for many people that have envisioned a better way to interact with the sea which is so important to this community. After visiting the new Port of Portland Marina for the official opening by Premier Denis Napthine with lots of visitors, we had time to take a walk over the site with the Marina Manager Gary Bebbington and the Project Managers Graham and Belinda Ainley from Ainley Projects. Ainley has decades of experience in civil, structural and environmental engineering. It was a rewarding time for the team to present this latest addition to the assets of the local community. The best part was the request for a post mortem walk around with just the four of us.

Although we are all happy with the outcome, and the system has already been tested with 40 knot winds, it was the insights gained that have value for those of us doing such projects in the future. Gary is a professional skipper who also has many years marketing experience, so it was very valuable to hear what he pointed out. Firstly the entrance to the whole project had land works “by others” yet the marina contract started from the mooring block of the gangway. In future it would pay to have a design meeting with both parties to ensure an integrated entrance, that has some seating and services to welcome visitors to the marina. We will take this on board.

Another item was the pedestals that were drawn in the tender documents on the fingers and therefore were placed as such. Now they are in close proximity to bowsprits on some vessels and a cause for concern. My personal preference is to always place all services on the main walkways and preserve “dumb” fingers that can easily be moved later utilising the T slot. This is a valuable feature of the Superior marina systems and allows users to modify their layout inexpensively as their market changes. Service free fingers should be adopted by the design community as a priority.

Security gates were another challenge brought on by local conditions. Bass Strait often throws up major winds and Portland is a very windy place. Therefore the sail area on clear Perspex security doors means they will not auto close. The issue was solved with a mesh upper panel however this is another opportunity for a fail proof design. Security on marinas is a tricky concept as it really prevents only those people who are basically honest and do not want to get wet! A determined intruder will obviously come by water regardless. However it is prudent to select carefully locations where minimal barriers can prevent easy dry walking access. This should be done without making larger mesh fences that make the whole site look like a jail. Using the water as a passive barrier is the trick and there is more to be done in this area yet.

This marina also has the largest installation to date as yet of the Superior fender soft touch system. There is well over 100m along the visitor access area where charter boats pick up customers where this soft touch is in operation. This inner radial matrix core will compress to half of its diameter without transmitting load onto the marina. This means a skilled skipper may call in to temporary dock without fenders while doing a passenger pickup. The charter skipper giving a tour to Premier Napthine today actually commented that he had upgraded his vessel to a diesel on the basis of the new marina to be ready for more business. He also has a side entry door fitted to satisfy demand for wheelchair access. This was in response to one determined customer, a lady who in a wheelchair kept saying ” when are you taking me fishing?”. Now with a specially equipped charter boat, soft touch fender and a carefully constructed disability access gangway, this dream is a reality.

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